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Honoring Georgia's Confederate Soldiers Since 1896
Sons of Confederate Veterans

Honoring Confederate Soldiers Since 1896

Following the War Between the States, the surviving Southern soldiers came together to form a veterans organization known as the United Confederate Veterans [UCV]. The Sons of Confederate Veterans [SCV] is the heir to this legacy.

The SCV is the oldest hereditary organization for male descendants of Confederate soldiers. Organized at Richmond, Virginia in 1896, the SCV continues to serve as a historical, patriotic heritage organization dedicated to ensuring that a true history of the 1861-1865 period is preserved.

The citizen soldiers who fought for the Confederacy were motivated by the preservation of liberty and freedom in the South. The tenacity with which Confederate soldiers fought underscored their belief in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution. These attributes are the underpinning of our republic and represent the foundation upon which this nation was built. Today the Sons of Confederate Veterans is preserving the history and legacy of these heroes so future generations can understand the motives that animated the Southern Cause.

Feature Story

Historic Shiloh Methodist Cemetery

Historic Shiloh Methodist Cemetery in Byron, Georgia was established with the church in 1831. The church itself served the Houston and Peach County communities for over 100 years and was the place of worship for the area’s earliest inhabitants. Although the church was dismantled in the 1960’s, the history of the people resting within the cemetery boundaries is timeless. Over 7 acres in size, had it not been for the limitless service of Shiloh church member Mr. Reggie Holleman and a former police officer Ron Bohnstedt, Shiloh May have been completely forgotten and lost to time. The Lt. James T. Woodward, Camp #1399 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans became intimately involved in the fight to protect and preserve Shiloh in 2015. Through contacts with the Warner Robins Police Department and Georgia Military College, the Camp was made aware of the largely forgotten history of the site, including the now [...]